The Tattoo Murder Case

The Tattoo Murder Case Miss Kinue Nomura survived World War II only to be murdered in Tokyo her severed limbs left behind Gone is that part of her that bore one of the most beautiful full body tattoos ever rendered by her

  • Title: The Tattoo Murder Case
  • Author: Akimitsu Takagi
  • ISBN: 9781569471081
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Miss Kinue Nomura survived World War II only to be murdered in Tokyo, her severed limbs left behind Gone is that part of her that bore one of the most beautiful full body tattoos ever rendered by her late father Kenzo Matsushita, a young doctor, must assist his detective brother who is in charge of the case, because he was Kinue s secret lover and the first person on theMiss Kinue Nomura survived World War II only to be murdered in Tokyo, her severed limbs left behind Gone is that part of her that bore one of the most beautiful full body tattoos ever rendered by her late father Kenzo Matsushita, a young doctor, must assist his detective brother who is in charge of the case, because he was Kinue s secret lover and the first person on the murder scene The Tattoo Murder Case was originally published in 1948 this is the first English translation.

    The Tattoo Murder Case by Akimitsu Takagi The Tattoo Murder Case is a vintage mystery by a Japanese author, Akimitsu Takagi It was published in and translated into English in by Deborah Boehm The story is set in Tokyo and it involves the tattoo culture in Japan At the time, tattoos were illegal in Japan. The Tattoo Murder Case Soho Crime The Tattoo Murder Case by Akimitsu Takagi is a classic among the increasing number of Japanese mysteries now available in English translation As is the case with most such mysteries, this book features unusual characters and psychological issues, introducing as well a walk on the wild side of Japan s youth culture. The Tattoo Murder Case Kindle edition by Akimitsu Takagi The Tattoo Murder Case by Akimitsu Takagi is a classic among the increasing number of Japanese mysteries now available in English translation As is the case with most such mysteries, this book features unusual characters and psychological issues, introducing as well a walk on the wild side of Japan s youth culture. The Tattoo Murder Case by Akimitsu Takagi, Paperback The Tattoo Murder Case by Akimitsu Takagi Kinue Nomura survived World War II only to be murdered in Tokyo, her severed limbs discovered in a room locked from the inside Gone is the part of her that bore one of the most beautiful full body tattoos ever rendered. Home The Murder Get notified when The Murder goes live The site is currently under construction, but cool stuff is coming Email First Name Last Name KEEP ME POSTED Close Sign up for The Murder s updates, and tips for your next tattoo fname email SUBSCRIBE Skip to content KY , Morehead, KY KY , Morehead, KY Facebook The Tattoo Murder Case book by Akimitsu Takagi Thriftbooks The Tattoo Murder Case is as intricately woven and colorful as the bewitching tattoo The combination of the three tattoos create the mystery through illusion and provide the only clues to solve the case.Takagi weaves together the cultural history of Japan and the reality of the recently defeated country. Download PDF The Tattoo Murder Case Free Online New THE TATTOO MURDER CASE Download The Tattoo Murder Case ebook PDF or Read Online books in PDF, EPUB, and Mobi Format Click Download or Read Online button to THE TATTOO MURDER CASE book pdf for free now. Accused murderer wants murder neck tattoo removed before A man with the word MURDER prominently tattooed on his neck has been accused of killing a man and now he wants the inking removed before his trial. Akimitsu Takagi On the recommendation of a fortune teller, he decided to become a writer He sent the second draft of his first detective story, The Tattoo Murder Case, to the great mystery writer Edogawa Ranpo, who recognized his skill and who recommended it to a publisher It was published in . Home Murder of Crows Tattoo Utahs Premier Tattoo Studio At Murder of Crows Tattoo we look at the Art of Tattooing through the eyes of an artist, we take an artistic approach to every tattoo, from Design, placement, and color, you can always be assured that your tattoo will look the way it should.

    • Best Read [Akimitsu Takagi] ¾ The Tattoo Murder Case || [Graphic Novels Book] PDF ✓
      146 Akimitsu Takagi
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    About "Akimitsu Takagi"

    1. Akimitsu Takagi

      Akimitsu Takagi , Takagi Akimitsu , 25 September 1920 9 September 1995 , was the pen name of a popular Japanese crime fiction writer active during the Showa period of Japan His real name was Takagi Seiichi edit BiographyTakagi was born in Aomori City in Aomori Prefecture in northern Japan He graduated from the Daiichi High School which was often abbreviated to Ichi ko and Kyoto Imperial University, where he studied metallurgy He was employed by the Nakajima Aircraft Company, but lost his job with the prohibition on military industries in Japan after World War II.On the recommendation of a fortune teller, he decided to become a writer He sent the second draft of his first detective story, The Tattoo Murder Case, to the great mystery writer Edogawa Ranpo, who recognized his skill and who recommended it to a publisher It was published in 1948.He received the Tantei sakka club sho Mystery Writers Club Award for his second novel, the Noh Mask Murder Case in 1950.Takagi was a self taught legal expert and the heroes in most of his books were usually prosecutors or police detectives, although the protagonist in his first stories was Kyosuke Kamizu, an assistant professor at Tokyo University.Takagi explored variations on the detective novel in the 1960s, including historical mysteries, picaresque novels, legal mysteries, economic crime stories, and science fiction alternate history.In The Informer 1965 , a former Tokyo stock exchange worker is fired because of illegal trades A subsequent stock market crash means that he has no hope of returning to his old career and therefore he accepts a job from an old friend even though he eventually discovers that the new firm he works for is really an agency for industrial espionage The plot is based on actual events.He was struck by stroke several times since 1979, and died in 1995.From

    529 thoughts on “The Tattoo Murder Case”

    1. Imagine for a moment Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had decided to set his Sherlock Holmes mysteries in Japan. Now imagine the time is not the late 19th century, but the middle of the 20th century, right after the devastation of World War II. Takagi Akimitsu (1920-1995) published this, his first novel, to great acclaim in 1948 Tokyo. Translated into English for the first time in 1999 by Deborah Boehm and published by Soho Crime, this translation bridges the half century since the novel was first publish [...]


    2. I stumbled upon this book while looking for a different Japanese murder mystery and am eternally grateful. This book was originally published in Japan in 1948; however, it does not seem dated at all. The only way you know the year it takes place is the references to the destruction of Tokyo. I am usually a slow reader, but I devoured this book. A fascinating story that includes a look at how the Japanese culture viewed tattoos, the artists who create them, and the people who choose to adorn thei [...]


    3. Imagine for a moment Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had decided to set his Sherlock Holmes mysteries in Japan. Now imagine the time is not the late 19th century, but the middle of the 20th century, right after the devastation of World War II. Takagi Akimitsu (1920-1995) published this, his first novel, to great acclaim in 1948 Tokyo. Translated into English for the first time in 1999 by Deborah Boehm and published by Soho Crime, this translation bridges the half century since the novel was first publish [...]


    4. 3.8 stars for The Tattoo Murder Case by Akimitsu Takagi, and this is his first novel from more than half a century ago. The explanation for the murder mystery is outstanding and logical, the setup about a serial murder case surrounding tattoos and the gloomy, haunting atmosphere is great too, but the characters look kind of flat though it doesn't bother me too much: we are reminded by the novelist that in the 1950s Japanese society, tattooed people were being viewed as outlaws and criminals and [...]


    5. Comment upon first reading: Enjoyable Japanese whodunnit. The characters are somewhat bland in their polite Japanese way, and the solution to the murder mystery is interesting in the same way that the solution to a crossword puzzle is interesting. The chief strengths of the narrative are its evocation of post-war Japan and its portrayal of the Japanese art tattoo subculture. On the whole, worth your time if you have an interest in things Japanese.Comment upon second reading: I have upgraded from [...]


    6. With mystery books, sometimes you find a book where the mystery is nothing to call your friends about, but where the atmosphere, characters, style and all that surrounds the mystery more than makes for it. This is one of this cases."The Tattoo Murder Case" starts with Kenzo visiting a tattoo contest, where he meets a lurid and fascinating woman called Kinue, who seems to be the lover of a shady character. Kenzo gets entangled with her and thenFrom the very first sentence, the book is an intrigui [...]


    7. Good mystery with lots of twists. One of the main characters, Kyosuke, is a Sherlock Holmes-ish type character. It's one of the things I enjoyed most, his logical reasoning process, which was written well. It was also quite interesting to get a snapshot of the world of Tattoos in mid-20th century Japan. I had no idea it was illegal, however, I did know it was associated with the crime world in later years. Also maybe more on a personal note, I enjoyed the descriptions of traditional Japanese hou [...]


    8. Whoa! What a book!Ini novel detektif Jepang yg saya baca setelah The Tokyo Zodiac Murder. And so far, i liked it.Bersetingkan di kota Tokyo pasca perang dunia ke-2, The Tattoo Murder Case, seperti judulnya, membawa pembaca ke budaya tato di Jepang. Topik tentang tato ini lumayan menarik dan sedikit memperbaiki prekonsepsi saya terhadap apa yang dinamakan dengan tato.Tato, bagi saya berkonotasi dengan geng atau orang yg bertendensi melakukan tindak kriminal. Tidak heran, dari sejumlah org bertato [...]


    9. When I saw the basics here-- Japanese Murder Mystery circa 1947-- I couldn't wait to read it. But there's something wrong. This comes across as disconnected, disjointed, and at the same time kind of homogenized for general acceptance. Seems like it's one of three possibles:It strains to be generic and polite. Maybe something in the very recent war and conditions of Occupation under which it was written ? The depiction of the locations and the cultural locale are simply too broad and smoothed-ove [...]


    10. This is one very engaging murder mystery that I have read in quite a while. Set in Japan, it makes a beautiful blend of mythology and that thing of the human mind that borders on ingenuity, deviousness and something more. There is the tattoo art; the love and pride associated with the Japanese form of the art as well as the question of its legality in post-war Japan and a somewhat macabre obsession of one of the characters, Dr. Tattoo with skinning and preserving tattooed human skins. Eww! Anywa [...]


    11. Well executed, this had me thinking of locked room mysteries for a while However, if I really had to nitpick, Kyosuke Kamizu's introduction was a deus ex machina. But I will certainly pick up the other two of Takagi's translated novels (if only I could read Japanese!).


    12. Mark Douglas Nelson narrated this book and I had a really hard time with the sing song pattern of his voice. Many of the descriptions related to the art of tattoo are beautiful, but the detective story fell flat for me. "In these crazy times stones float and leaves sink, and the larger the fish is, the more easily it slips through the net.""Doppelgänger—double-walker. The word had originally had mildly supernatural connotations—“ a wraith of one alive,” said Kenzo’s German-Japanese di [...]


    13. A classic of Japanese crime fiction, this book was first published, albeit in a slightly different form, in 1948, at a time when the country was still recovering from the impact of war.A young forensic medical student with post-traumatic stress after a stint as a medic in the Philippines, begins a passionate affair with a beautiful woman who is covered with strange, sexually alluring traditional Japanese tattoos. Soon after, she is murdered, dismembered and her tattooed torso stolen from the sce [...]


    14. A Japanese version of a closed room murder. When a woman is murdered, her fully tattooed torso stolen, and her limbs and head left behind in the bathroom, is found, the suspects range from her boyfriend, boyfriend's brother, a professor with a penchant for buying tattooed skin from owners upon their demise, and an ex-boyfriend recently released from prison. The woman is the daughter of a reknown and controversial Japanese tattoo artist. Kenzo Matsushita, a young doctor with a secret association [...]


    15. Apparently this guy is one of Japan's more popular mystery writers. It starts off fairly well, with a seedy, kinky postwar Tokyo milieu. The most interesting thing about it is the description of a subculture of tattoo freaks - mobsters, wild women, and their admirers. Some of them are covered all over with tattoos, and there is a good portrayal of an outdoor display/contest. One guy had even his penis covered with pictures. In this story, a young, decent Japanese medical student gets involved wi [...]


    16. There are two main things that I'm walking away from this book adoring, and that I want to share.First, I am an individual exposed to far too many crime and forensic shows. I like 80% of them and am subjected to the other 20% by my parents. They're the reason I stopped binging on mystery books; when all you really watch are whodunits you get fed up with them really quickly. The Tattoo Murder Case was originally published in Japanese in 1948. Seeing the forensics of that time compared to what we [...]


    17. The Tattoo Murder Case is a vintage mystery by a Japanese author, Akimitsu Takagi. It was published in 1948 and translated into English in 1998 by Deborah Boehm. The story is set in Tokyo and it involves the tattoo culture in Japan. At the time, tattoos were illegal in Japan. I enjoyed the book for the picture of Japan at the time. I found this to be a good and enjoyable mystery, at times, but I did have quibbles with some elements. I did not really like the locked room mystery element, and the [...]


    18. PROTAGONIST: Kenzo Matsushita, forensic doctoral studentSETTING: 1947 TokyoRATING: 3.25WHY: In Japan, tattooing is viewed as an art form. In fact, when people die, often their tattooed skins are collected and displayed. Kinue Nomura has a masterpiece tattoo. When she is found dead with her torso removed, her latest lover, Kenzo Matsushita, he sets out to find the killer. Instead, more death ensues and his amateurish efforts wreck the police investigation led by his brother. A "Boy Genius" friend [...]


    19. Going to Japan, so wanted to get a feel for the culture. Tattoos are a prominent feature in the world of not only the Yakuza, but among a large other community. So this novel was a great description of its place in Japanese culture. Great mystery story too. A little description of the time right after the war, but actually very little focus on that aspect of the story just minor notice the resilience of the people coming back to life after the ravages of war on Tokyo.


    20. I had read this novel years ago and was pleasantly surprised when I found it while browsing through the website. Akimitsu Takagi was one of the first Japanese writers whose work had me hooked from page one and all the way through to the disturbing yet enthralling conclusion. It is a must read, full of mystery, tattoos and Japanese mythological symbolism. Beware of the curse: Frog eats Slug, Snake eats Frog, Slug dissolves Snake.


    21. This was great book - the writing was fresh and contemporary even though it originally came out in 1948. The story had great pacing and kept me enthralled until the end. It had slot of unexpected twists and turns in the plot so it was not predictable. If you are into Japanese culture or tattoos, this book is a must read. It is well worth your time. .


    22. This is a classic locked-room mystery, and as such is very good. It's been several years since I read it, so I won't offer a review until I find my copy and re-read it. This book is what got me into both Soho crime series, Japanese and Chinese murder mysteries, and Kurosawa's noir films.


    23. A must read for fans of mystery or japanese culture. It is unapologetic about the cultural references though the author doesn't bog you down with explanations of things as their is an assumption that you will understand the finer aspects of the culture.


    24. Above all, Takagi's incorporation of Japanese tattoo culture comes into the forefront as what separates this book from other murder mysteries. Sure, the locked room as a central theme in the book was quite fascinating but so were many other such schemes in other mystery books. I am especially drawn to the sense of body as a canvas and how tattoo's, not "sushi tattoos", but whole body tattoos, start to lose their form in the body, and the body to the tattoo. This post structuralist sense of the s [...]


    25. Akimitsu Takagi has his main character a fan of Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett. Too bad Takagi didn't learn anything from the two lords of detective fiction. Where the mysteries by Chandler and Hammett are as tight as a drum without a spare word, The Tattoo Murder case is flabby and overwritten. It's a great murder mystery. Good strong plot, the characters are defined. But Takagi repeats himself constantly. Near the 3/4 point, it is obvious he is padding as he treads water. He hesitates t [...]


    26. I read the description of the book and thought it would be an interesting read but after forcing myself through a few chapters I had to stop. It was very slow moving, uneventful and boring in my opinion. I hate to start a book and not finish it but this book was too slow for my taste.


    27. I stopped reading after chapter 2. It's just not for me, though I love mysteries/thriller or detective novels. Reading this one I just lost interest early on.


    28. What a pleasant surprise! Never heard of the author and never read a Japanese novel before this one, but this was a fantastic whodunit that doubled as an interesting look at 1950 Japan.


    29. Highly recommended. Unputdownable book. A glimpse into the world of Japanese tattoo culture in the early post-war years.


    30. A friend of mine handed me a Christmas present one year, with the tag reading something like "knowing what you're interested in, you'll probably like this." It is the kind of present only a close friend could have chosen, combining as it does my vague but long standing ambition to get a tattoo, my love for Japan following a trip there several years ago and my almost constant reading.Akimitsu Takagi's "The Tattoo Murder Case" was originally published and set in a Japan recovering from the Second [...]


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